Scientific Sessions

Session titles are listed alphabetically and linked to session descriptions below.
(Content as listed is subject to change.)

Agents of Change and Dealing with the Unknowns of the Future
Best Student Research Paper
Emerging Technologies and Applications to Cereals, Grains and Flours: The Next 100 Years…..
Establishing Dietary Reference Intakes for Bioactives: Cereal Grains Focus
Gluten in Cereal-Based Foods—Benefits and Risks
Innovating with the Climate-Friendly Ancient Grains
Koushik Seetharaman Memorial Symposium on New Aspects of Starch Structure and Granule Architecture
Little Beans, Big Opportunities: The Farm to Market Story of Dry Bean Ingredients
New Frontiers—Dietary Fiber Methodology, Gaining Perspective on a Complex Issue
Nutrition for the Future: Filling the Protein Gaps From Cereal and Legume Proteins
Pulse Ingredients in Cereal Food Processing
Reflecting on the Past Century and the Role of Asian Market & Products—Where to From Now!
Rice Constituents, Structure, and Effects of Processing
Sprouted Grains: Paving the Way to Nutritious and Safe Products
Sustainability, Genetics, and Future Cultivars—Impact on the Food Chain
The Future of Oats and Barley in Processing and Health
The Past as a Prologue to the Future of Milling and Baking 


 

Symposia

Agents of Change and Dealing with the Unknowns of the Future

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors: Milling and Baking Division, Soft Wheat and Flour Products Technical Committee, and Chemical Leavening Technical Committee
Organizer: Arthur Bettge, ADB Wheat Consulting, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.

This session presents information on the necessity of change in milling and baking and the causes of the underlying need for change. What has worked well in the past is no longer sufficient for the future. Health, nutrition, food safety, and requirements for functional foods are driving alterations in the entire industry. Discussion includes approaches to the future challenges millers and bakers will soon confront.

  • Chemical leavening agents: How to address functionality issues when mineral reduction is required for health and food safety. BARBARA HEIDOLPH, Innophos, Inc., Cranbury, NJ, U.S.A.
  • Milling whole grain flours: Challenges surrounding production of a functional ingredient. GLEN WEAVER, Ardent Mills, Omaha, NE, U.S.A.
  • Whole grain flours: Coping with bran-associated compounds and their impact on storage and utilization. MIRKO BUNZEL, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany
  • How to replace chlorination of flour: New, and not-so-new, approaches to modifying functionality. C.J. LIN, The Mennel Milling Co., Fostoria, OH, U.S.A.
  • Modifying flour performance by exploiting the potential of enzymes and non-starch carbohydrates. CHRISTOPHE COURTIN, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Symposia

Best Student Research Paper

Organizer: Professional Development Panel, Sean Finnie, PDP Chair, Bay State Milling, Minneapolis, MN, USA
Financial Sponsors: B.C. Williams Food Products, Cain Food Industries, Inc., Cargill, Corbion, Frito-Lay Inc., General Mills, Mennel Milling Co., The Mitsubishi International Food Ingredients, Mother Murphy's Flavors, Starquest F.O.O.D. Consulting LLC, TIC Gums Inc.

  • Interaction of proanthocyanidins with partially gelatinized normal and waxy maize starch and impact on in-vitro starch digestibility. D. B. AMOAKO, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Starch and protein digestibility of novel extruded binary blended foods. M. JOSEPH, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.
  • Influence of vacuum mixing on textural properties and protein structure of noodle dough. R. LIU, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences/ Key Laboratory of Agro-Products Processing, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China
  • Spring wheat gliadins: Have they changed in 100 years? M. MALALGODA, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.
  • Formation and amylase resistance of a novel nano-particulate fraction obtained by acid hydrolysis of normal, hylon V and VII maize starches. M. PEREZ HERRERA, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
  • Time-temperature distribution studies during preconditioning of extruded pet food. T. ZHOU, Food Science Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

Symposia

Emerging Technologies and Applications to Cereals, Grains and Flours: The Next 100 Years…..

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors: Spectroscopic Methods, Physical Testing Methods
Organizer: Steven Zbylut, Medallion Laboratories/General Mills Inc., Golden Valley, MN, U.S.A.

Future analyses of grain based products focus on combining technologies to rapidly deliver more pertinent information. Symposium focus: review and application of newly developed and emerging technologies; their utility to enhance, verify and improve new and existing products by developing more insightful understanding of physical and chemical interactions related to identity, processing conditions, shelf-life, flavor, texture and ingredient interactions inherent in grain based products.

  • Analytical & spectroscopic challenges in the production of gluten-free foods. STEVEN ZBYLUT, Medallion Laboratories/General Mills Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.
  • Understanding powder flowability of corn flours. J. YIN, Freeman Technology, Bayside, NY, U.S.A.
  • I.R. & Raman Imaging of grain based products: What is the future potential of these technologies? STEPHEN DELWICHE, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.
  • Physical testing capabilities and implications—A brief review. TIMOTHY PETERS, Medallion Laboratories/General Mills Inc., Golden Valley, MN, U.S.A.
  • Analysis of cereal grains by mass spectrometry. JACK STEVENS, General Mills, Golden Valley, MN, U.S.A.

Symposia

Establishing Dietary Reference Intakes for Bioactives: Cereal Grains Focus

Sponsoring Committee or Sponsor:  Bioactive Compounds Methods Technical Committee
Organizers: Jodee Johnson and YiFang Chu, PepsiCo, Barrington, IL, U.S.A.
Financial Sponsor: National Osteoporosis Foundation

Cereal grains contain a variety of bioactives, however no Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) exist for these compounds; therefore little can be said about them on product labels. The objectives are to provide an overview of bioactives and DRIs, understand the path towards establishing bioactive DRIs, and discuss the current research on oat bioactives. With a better understanding of where we are in establishing DRIs for bioactives, we can be better suited to help progress this forward.

  • Dietary Reference Intakes in the United States. TAYLOR WALLACE, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, U.S.A.
  • The evolving path towards dietary guidance for bioactives. JOHN ERDMAN, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.
  • Oat bioactives: Types, mechanisms, and functions. JEFFREY BLUMBERG, Tufts University, Boston, MA, U.S.A. 

Symposia

Gluten in Cereal-Based Foods—Benefits and Risks

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Protein & Enzymes Technical Committee, Protein Division
Organizer: Peter Koehler, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Freising, Germany

The techno-functional properties of gluten are the prerequisite for the unique baking quality of wheat flour. On the other hand, with an increasing number of people affected by gluten intolerances, the technological use of gluten in foods is seen critically by celiac societies and consumers. This science café will highlight both the beneficial and unwanted effects of gluten and also address the challenges of analyzing gluten in dietetic products for celiac disease patients. Possible ways out of this dilemma between positive and negative sides of gluten will be discussed.

  • Gluten in cereal-based foods—Benefits and risks. PETER KOEHLER, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelchemie, Freising, Germany
  • Gluten—Related disorders. KATHARINA SCHERF, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Lebensmittelchemie, Freising, Germany
  • Improved reference materials for gluten-free analysis. ROLAND ERNEST POMS, MoniQA–International Association for Monitoring and Quality Assurance in the Total Food Supply Chain, Vienna, Austria
  • Gluten method measurement variation. PAUL WEHLING, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.
  • The challenges and possible solutions in determining the gluten concentration in complex food matrices. THOMAS GRACE, Bia Diagnostics and Elution Technologies, Colchester, VT, U.S.A.

Symposia

Innovating with the Climate-Friendly Ancient Grains

Sponsoring Committee or Sponsor: The USAID Feed The Future supported Sorghum and Millet Innovation Lab
Organizer: John Taylor, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Joseph Awika, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.

World experts in the so-called Ancient grains: sorghum, the millets, pseudocereals and pulses will come together to strategize "What if climate change renders many areas on earth unsuitable for cultivation of our big 4 cereals; will we starve? Or how must we innovate using the climate-friendly ancient grains?" It will determine the major innovations required to produce sufficient amounts of these grains and to make them viable alternatives in our staple grain-based foods and beverages.

  • Ancient grains: Do they really have better nutritional quality and health promoting properties than the Big 4 cereals? JOSEPH AWIKA, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Can ancient grains really feed the world: Developed and developing world perspectives? JOHN TAYLOR, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
  • Prospects for genetic improvement of ancient grains. DIRK HAYS, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.
  • Pseudocereals—Can they become mainstream staple foods? REGINE SCHOENLECHNER, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
  • Underutilized climate-friendly African legumes: Food, nutritional, and health-promoting aspects. GYEBI DUODU, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Symposia

Koushik Seetharaman Memorial Symposium on New Aspects of Starch Structure and Granule Architecture

Sponsoring Committee or Sponsor: Carbohydrate Division
Organizers: Bruce Hamaker, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; Teri Paeschke, Cargill Texturizing Solutions, North America, Wayzata, MN, U.S.A.; Amy Lin, University of Idaho & Washington State University, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.

The symposium will honor the work and life of Koushik Seetharaman by presenting the latest information about internal molecular architecture of starch, granule design, and functionality. A short dedication will be given on Koushik’s commitment to education and research in cereal science, his work in Africa and India, and to AACC International. The symposium will be fashioned to attract a broad audience of those whose lives Koushik touched and those interested in the latest developments in starch science.

  • A few words about Koushik Seetharaman as a person and researcher. BRUCE HAMAKER, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Starch molecular structure. ERIC BERTOFT, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland
  • Cereal Starch structure and function in foods. JAN DELCOUR, Katholieke Univ Leuven, Heverlee, Belgium
  • Koushik’s group work on starch structure and properties relationships. VARATHARAJAN VAMADEVAN, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
  • Starch and its nutitional quality. AMY LIN, University of Idaho and Washington State University, Moscow, ID U.S.A.; BRUCE HAMAKER, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 

Symposia

Little Beans, Big Opportunities: The Farm to Market Story of Dry Bean Ingredients

Sponsoring Committee or Sponsor:  Pulse and Legume Committee
Organizers:  Janice Rueda, ADM, Decatur, IL, U.S.A.; Mike Grusak, USDA-ARS, Houston, TX, U.S.A.

With consumers looking for clean-label, nutrient-dense, sustainable ingredients and food makers looking for compliments to traditional grains, the humble dry bean has become the new rising star of food trends. This engaging, interactive session will offer a "big picture" perspective on the dry bean story - from sustainable agriculture to public health and nutrition policy - and tie it all together with a "real world" experience of successfully bringing a better-for-you bean-based product line to market.

  • Advances in U.S. dry bean production: Sustainable nutrition, GMO-free. MIKE GRUSAK, USDA-ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Houston, TX, U.S.A.
  • Agriculture as an instrument of public health: The potential of dry beans. HENRY THOMPSON, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.
  • Whole bean ingredients: Where do they fit on MyPlate? JANICE RUEDA, ADM Edible Bean Specialties, Inc., Decatur, IL, U.S.A.
  • Little beans, big opportunities: The Beanitos story. DAN COSTELLO, Beanitos, Austin, TX, U.S.A.

Symposia

New Frontiers—Dietary Fiber Methodology, Gaining Perspective on a Complex Issue

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors: Dietary Fiber and Other Carbohydrates, Carbohydrates Division
Organizers: Jonathan DeVries, Medallion Laboratories/General Mills, Golden Valley, MN, U.S.A.; Stuart Craig, Dupont, Somers, NY, U.S.A.

Resistance to human digestion is a unique feature of dietary fiber (DF) as a nutrient. DF is a complex mixture (mostly carbohydrates) of food components. Analysis does not involve quantitating a single chemical, but rather the food mass that resists digestion. Therefore, key to solid methodology for DF labeling: simulate human digestion in the laboratory; capture the digestion resistant fraction of the food; and conduct this reproducibility. This Science Café will focus on optimizing digestion simulation, capture of dietary fiber, and the need for reproducible, stable methodology for DF labeling purposes.

  • Improvements to the Codex-Definition Dietary Fiber Methods. DAVID PLANK, Medallion Labs, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.
  • Considerations for simulating human digestion in vitro. BRUCE HAMAKER, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
  • Food labeleing of dietary fiber. PAULA TRUMBO, US Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD, U.S.A.

Symposia

Nutrition for the Future: Filling the Protein Gaps From Cereal and Legume Proteins

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Protein Division, Nutrition Division
Organizers: Monjur Hossen, Kellogg, Battle Creek, MI, U.S.A.; Katharina Scherf, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Freising, Germany; Bram Pareyt, Puratos NV, Groot-Bijgaarden, Belgium

The question—with growing world population and increasing consumer demands, can we produce sufficient animal protein to feed the world? Surely we need to have alternative plant protein sources i.e. cereal and legume proteins. While we feed the world from these alternative sources, we still face the challenge to meet the quality protein need. The symposium will focus on nutritional aspects of combination of cereal and legume proteins to improve their collective nutritional quality.

  • In vivo and in vitro estimates of the quality of protein in pulse: Cereal blends. JAMES HOUSE, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Future in food formulations: Why and how to balance cereal and pulse proteins in food applications? HEATHER MASKUS, Canadian International Grains Institute, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Moving beans off the picnic plate and into the mainstream: Lessons from school food. JANICE RUEDA, ADM Edible Bean Specialties, Inc., Decatur, IL, U.S.A.
  • Health benefits of pulse proteins and pulse-cereal blends. CHRISTOPHER MARINANGELI, Pulse Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Lactic fermentation as a tool for improving the nutritional quality of cereal and legume proteins. CARLO G. RIZZELLO, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy

Symposia

Pulse Ingredients in Cereal Food Processing

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Pulse and Legume Committee, Program Committee
Organizers:  Wajira Ratnayake & Nagul Naguleswaran, Ingredion, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, U.S.A.
Financial Sponsor: Ingredion Inc.

Pulse-based ingredients are increasingly used in cereal food processing. Increasing demand for high-protein, high-fiber processed products has created a unique opportunity for pulses to play a major role in traditional cereal-based processed foods. This symposium will cover the importance and recent research advances in processing pulse ingredients for cereal foods.

  • Use of pulse ingredients in food applications. DILEK UZUNALIOGLU, Ingredion, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, U.S.A.
  • Pulse protein structure-functional properties and food applications. LINGYUN CHEN, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
  • Pulse carbohydrates: Properties and applications. NAGUL NAGULESWARAN, Ingredion, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, U.S.A.
  • Flavor and anti-nutrients in pulses: Challenges in recent advances in food applications. MEHMET TULBEK, AGT Food and Ingredients Inc., Saskatoon, SK, Canada
  • Extrusion processing of pulse ingredients. GIRISH GANJYAL, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.

Symposia

Reflecting on the Past Century and the Role of Asian Market & Products—Where to From Now!

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Asian Products Technical Committee, Rice Milling and Quality Technical Committee
Organizers:  Larisa Cato, Australian Export Grains Innovation Centre, South Perth, Australia; Gary Hou, Wheat Marketing Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A.; Jinsong Bao, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

An overview of the importance of Asian market and memberships to AACC International begin the session; followed by a research overview on the current status of breeding efforts to develop improved wheat varieties for Asian noodles and steamed breads, challenges and opportunities of development of healthy whole-grain Asian products, and development of innovative technology in determining noodle texture. The session concludes with a presentation on the new technology and processing of alternative, gluten-free noodles that are attractive to many consumers.

  • Quality research into Asian cereal-based foods—A historical perspective. LARISA CATO, Australian Export Grains Innovation Centre, South Perth, WA, Australia
  • Importance of health & nutrition in the Asian context: How to cope with the new challenges? GARY HOU, Wheat Marketing Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A.
  • Gluten-free noodle technology of making, evaluation techniques—New technology and developments. MEI-YING SU, China Grain Products R&D Institute, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Cereal research, industry, and products in Japan: Past and future perspective. HIDEKI OKUSU, Nippon Flour Mills, Kanagawa, Japan

Symposia

Rice Constituents, Structure, and Effects of Processing

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Rice Division and Protein Division, Asian Products Technical Committee
Organizers:  Jinsong Bao, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; Delilah F. Wood, USDA ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A.

Rice is an important crop in the world, especially in Africa and Asia, and it is unique in the form of its consumption as whole kernels. New forms of rice products are under development, but our understanding of rice grain quality is insufficient. The objective of this symposium is to discuss the quality requirements and structure-function relationships in whole grain rice, parboiled rice, germinated rice and other rice-based foods.

  • “Cabling technology” for advanced grain management—Perspectives on rice quality and mycotoxins.GRIFFITHS G. ATUNGULU, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.
  • Crosstalks between biopolymers in rice: Are we listening to all the voices? FRANCESCO BONOMI, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
  • Understanding red rices—Difference and similarities. JOHN MANFUL, Africa Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin
  • Identification of phenolic acids and anthocyanins in whole grain rice and their relations to antioxidant capacity. JINSONG BAO, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
  • Rice microstructure. DELILAH F. WOOD, USDA ARS WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A.

Symposia

Sprouted Grains: Paving the Way to Nutritious and Safe Products

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Bioactive Compounds Technical Committee, Food Safety and Microbiology Technical Committee
Organizers:  Elsayed Abdelaal, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada; Roberto Serrano, Grain Millers, Eugene, OR, U.S.A.; Liyi Yang, Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, MI, U.S.A.; Boris Nemzer, FutureCeuticals, Momence, IL, U.S.A.; Andreia Bianchini, , University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.

Sprouting is a traditional practice to enhance taste and nutritional properties of grains and vegetables. The practice is currently adapted by the food industry to produce products that are marketed at premium prices. Now the use of sprouted grains is being added to the milling industry. In this symposium the safety of this process, along with nutrient bioavailability of sprouted grain, will be discussed. Additionally consumer perception will be addressed by experts from industry and academia.

  • Sprouted seeds as natural fortification/enrichment ingredients: Nutrient bioavailability, antioxidant activity and phytochemical/anti-nutrient profiles. MARIA OMARY, California State University, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.
  • Sprouting for specialty grains and pulses with enhanced benefits. IFENDU NNANNA, Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, MI, U.S.A.
  • Germinated grains processing considerations and product development. HAO FENG, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.
  • Sprouting and malting for specialty food ingredients. ROBERT HANSEN, Briess Malt & Ingredients Co., Chilton, WI, U.S.A.
  • Sprouted grains: Is the milling industry taking a chance? ANDREIA BIANCHINI, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.

Symposia

Sustainability, Genetics, and Future Cultivars—Impact on the Food Chain

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Molecular Biomarkers for Grain Technical Committee, Biotechnology Division
Organizers:  Ray Shillito, Bayer CropScience, Durham, NC, U.S.A.; Ravi Chibbar, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
Financial Sponsor: Bayer CropScience, LP

This symposium will provide an overview of the important topic of current breeding technologies for grains and oil seeds, new crops, potential food benefits, and how these technologies will affect the future of the food supply chain. The symposium will include speakers from the whole chain from molecular breeders through to the food processors. The session will conclude with a short panel discussion to discuss where these intersect and can communicate better.

  • Introduction to modern breeding technologies. RAY SHILLITO, Bayer CropScience, Durham, NC, U.S.A.
  • Application of modern plant breeding methods to crop improvement. ALLEN VAN DEYNZE, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.
  • Genomic technology meets the field—Prospects for wheat improvement. CURTIS POZNIAK, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
  • Quality management from the bin to the box. SCOTT HOOD, General Mills, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.
  • Supply chain adjustments, identity preservation, and purity challenges. JIM STITZLEIN, Consolidated Grain and Barge, Chesterfield, MO, U.S.A.

Symposia

The Future of Oats and Barley in Processing and Health

Sponsoring Committee or Sponsor:  Oats and Barley Technical Committee
Organizers:  Kelly Henderson, Richardson Milling, Portage la Prairie, MB, Canada; Nancy Ames, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada

Oats and barley continue to be sourced as healthful ingredients in food processing. To keep oats and barley relevant in the future, further research on processing and its effects need to be carried out. This symposium will discuss new concepts related to nutrient functionality, product/process development, food safety and testing methods.

  • Strategies to enhance health benefits of oat and barley beta-glucan. NANCY AMES, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Monitoring beta glucan viscosity throughout food processes: Quality control approach. TAMER GAMEL, Guelph Food Research Centre – Agriculture Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada
  • Effect of heat treatments on safety and nutritional properties of whole grain barley. LINDSEY BOYD, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • Effects of light pearling on the physical grain characteristics and composition of selected Canadian barley varieties. LINDA MALCOLMSON, LM FoodTech Solutions, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
  • QSorter: A fast and repeatable method based on NIR and VISION to remove gluten impurities from cereals. FRANCESCO DELL'ENDICE, QualySense, Glattbrugg, Switzerland

Symposia

The Past as a Prologue to the Future of Milling and Baking

Sponsoring Committees or Sponsors:  Milling and Baking Division, Soft Wheat and Flour Products Technical Committee, Chemical Leavening Technical Committee
Organizer:  Arthur Bettge, ADB Wheat Consulting, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.

This session discusses the transition and evolution of milling and baking from utilization of undifferentiated landrace grains to today’s highly specialized and technical industry we know today. Revisiting our history allows better understanding of the next major changes in milling and baking and allows better positioning of resources to address the changes before us. Presentations will address different facets of this transition.

  • Chemical leavening history and development by forward thinking chemists in the 1800s. DINNIE JORDAN , Kudos Blends, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, United Kingdom
  • Trans-fat functionality and replacement with functional, economic alternatives. LYNNE MOREHART, Cargill, Plymouth, MN, U.S.A.
  • Wheat breeding for functionality and grading: Differences among requirements and the effect in the marketplace. KIMBERLY GARLAND-CAMPBELL, USDA ARS Wheat Genetics, Quality, Physiology and Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.
  • How labels went from simple to complex and are now returning to clean, minimal ingredient lists. THERESA COGSWELL, BakerCogs, Inc., Overland Park, KS, U.S.A.
  • The art and science behind the creation of Modernist Cuisine. STEPHANIE SWANE, Modernist Cuisine, Bellevue, WA, U.S.A.

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